Upcoming Auditions

AUDITIONS for Tennessee Williams’ “THE GLASS MENAGERIE” directed by Christina Richardson, will be held at The Carriage House on Monday & Tuesday, July 9 & 10 at 7pm.

The show will run three weekends: Fridays & Saturdays, September 14, 15, 21, 22, 28 & 29 at 8pm and Sundays, September 16 & 17 at 4pm. 

Auditioners should be prepared to read from the script.

ROLES: 2 men and 2 women, as follows:

AMANDA WINGFIELD (The Mother) An iron butterfly; a proud woman fiercely devoted to her children; still holds onto the ideals of her genteel southern upbringing; girlish and grotesque; narcissistic and loving; sensitive and harsh; a realist while living in the reveries of a life-long vanished; charming and manipulative; a survivor.

TOM WINGFIELD (The Son) Narrator of the play; a poet who works in a warehouse; caught between responsibility to his family and following his dreams; explosive, mercurial, lonely, and caring; deeply devoted to his sister; a suffocating dreamer.

LAURA WINGFIELD (The Daughter) Sensitive; painfully shy; a childhood illness has left her physically impaired; retreats from reality through her collection of glass animals; loves her mother and brother; always puts others before herself.

JIM O’CONNOR (The Gentleman Caller) Tom's lone friend at the warehouse and former classmate of Laura's; a nice guy; pleasant in appearance and demeanor; peaked in high school; he is the outside world.

THE STORY: Tennesse Williams' The Glass Menagerie is a memory play told from eldest son Tom's viewpoint. The story revolves around Tom begrudgingly supporting the family his father has abandoned, his painfully shy sister, whose preoccupation with a collection of glass animals draws her away from reality and their mother, a faded, tragic remnant of Southern gentility. Set against the backdrop of the Great Depression, the family struggles together with the past, the future and one another.

 


Audition FAQs

+ What should I prepare?

Examine what the audition notice has requested and prepare appropriately. For example, if it asks for classical musical theater, do not bring a song from RENT. You should prepare something that suits you well and with which you are comfortable. We want to see you at your best!

+ Where are auditions held?

Generally auditions are held at the Carriage House Arts Center at 390 Grumman Ave in Norwalk, CT. However, always check the audition listing to make sure.

+ What should I wear?

Wear what you feel & look best in. Don't wear anything too distracting. You will do best in neutral tones and unpatterned pieces. If there is a dance component to the auditions, bring a change of clothes in which you can move easily. If you do not have official "dancewear," don't sweat it! Any gym clothes will do.

+ What should I bring?

If you have a headshot and a resume, great! But you do not need one to be considered. A smile goes a long way inside the audition room and out.

+ Who will be watching me?

The answer to this varies by production, but expect at least 3-4 people in the room: the director, the producer(s), the stage manager, and, if it's a musical, the choreographer and the musical director.

+ What happens in the audition room?

FOR A PLAY: Generally, you will be given "sides," or a section of the script, to read from, either with another actor or with a reader selected by the production team. FOR A MUSICAL: You will enter the room and, if you have sheet music, bring it to the accompanist. At this point you can discuss tempo and feel if you wish, and then make your way to the stage. If there is an X or a marker, walk to that spot; if not, as a rule, stand in the center of the stage. Introduce yourself to the people who are watching, and introduce your piece(s). Once you have completed your audition, thank the room, grab your music from the accompanist and thank him or her as well, and then exit the room.

+ What happens after the audition?

If there is no dance component to the audition, you may leave once you have completed your song or monologue. If the production team needs to see more from you, they will bring you back for callbacks.

+ What happens at callbacks?

This varies by production, but generally you will be called back to audition for a specific part in the production. If the production is a musical, you might also be taught a section of a song from that show or a specific dance combination.

+ What does it mean if I didn't get a callback?

Not getting a callback does not necessarily mean you are not going to be cast. It simply means the production team saw enough from you at your initial audition to make a casting decision about you.

+ When will I find out if I'm cast?

This varies, depending on the calendar of the production, but generally the production will be officailly cast within a week of callbacks. We do contact everyone who auditions (whether they are cast or not) as soon as we can.

+ What does it mean if I'm not cast?

If you are not cast, it does not reflect on your talent or ability. Production teams are looking for a very specific quality and look for each character, and that is out of your control! You should not take rejection as a value judgement on you, but rather as a opportunity to audition for another show.